I Hear America Singing

In I HEAR AMERICA SINGING, we bring you the exciting story of American concert song and its cultural contexts. With Thomas Hampson as your host and guide, we invite you to embark on a multimedia journey to listen to what our great poet Walt Whitman called “our varied carols” and to learn about the composers, poets, writers, artists, ideas, and events that have shaped the American song saga.

Whether you are a student or a professional, a seasoned listener or a novice to classical music, you can use this Web piece to explore an interdisciplinary tapestry of our creative heritage.

We recommend that you first enter I HEAR AMERICA SINGING in either of two ways: through the Overview, which provides a narrative history of American concert song, or the Timeline, which presents that history in listed format. Also included is a Resources section, containing an extensive bibliography; and the Credits.

February 22nd, 2005   |  Permalink  |  Filed under: Introduction

I Hear America Singing III
Introduction

In February 2005 Thomas Hampson launched a cycle on American Song in the Konzerthaus in Vienna, including a recital with songs on texts by Walt Whitman and other American writers, a concert with the Radio Symphony Orchestra, and a symposium on the topic of “Artists in America, Art from America”.

Thoughts on Song in America
An essay on the development of American Art Song by Thomas Hampson.
Deutsche Übersetzung von Andrea Richter

Recital program
Thomas Hampson, Wolfram Rieger
Konzerthaus, Vienna – February 24, 2005

Concert program
Thomas Hampson, Radio Symphonieorchester Wien, John Axelrod
Konzerthaus, Vienna – February 27, 2005

Künstler in Amerika, Kunst aus Amerika – Die Geschichte ihrer Spiegelbilder in der Welt
Symposium
Thomas Hampson, Joachim Brügge, Jon W. Newsom
Konzerthaus, Vienna – February 26, 2005

February 21st, 2005   |  Permalink  |  Filed under: Vienna 2005

I Hear America Singing II
Introduction

During the Salzburg Festival in 2001 Thomas Hampson performed a series of four concerts and held a symposium on Poetry and American Song. “The Hampson Project” series, as it was called, is another step in Thomas Hampson’s passionate research into the history of American Art Song.

The Very Heartbeat of Song – Thoughts on “I Hear America Singing”
An essay on American Art Song by Thomas Hampson
Deutsche Übersetzung von Stefan Drees

Aus Alter und Neuer Welt
Ein Essay von Stefan Drees
English Translation by Steve Wilder and Herbert Glass

The Hampson Project I
Works by Aaron Copland, Kurt Weill, Karl Amadeus Hartmann and Charles Ives
Radio Symphonieorchester Wien, Dennis Russell Davies
Felsenreitschule – July 30, 2001

The Hampson Project II
Recital
Thomas Hampson, Wolfram Rieger
Mozarteum – August 12, 2001

The Hampson Project III
Recital
Thomas Hampson, Barbara Bonney, Malcolm Martineau
Mozarteum – August 17, 2001

The Hampson Project IV
Recital
Thomas Hampson, Susan Graham, Malcolm Martineau
Mozarteum – August 22, 2001

The Hampson Project – “Amerikanische Lyrik in der Liedgeschichte, amerikanische Lyrik in Vertonungen amerikanischer und europäischer Komponisten”
Symposium
Concept and Presentation: Thomas Hampson, Siegfried Mauser
Mozarteum – August 5, 2001

February 21st, 2005   |  Permalink  |  Filed under: Salzburg 2001

I Hear America Singing I
Introduction

In I HEAR AMERICA SINGING, we bring you the exciting story of American concert song and its cultural contexts. With Thomas Hampson as your host and guide, we invite you to embark on a multimedia journey to listen to what our great poet Walt Whitman called “our varied carols” and to learn about the composers, poets, writers, artists, ideas, and events that have shaped the American song saga.

This Web piece is a companion to the GREAT PERFORMANCES telecast THOMAS HAMPSON: I HEAR AMERICA SINGING. A production of Thirteen/WNET in New York, this television special spotlights enduring American classics by Stephen Foster, Leonard Bernstein, and others, performed definitively by Hampson, Marilyn Horne, Frederica von Stade, Dawn Upshaw, Harolyn Blackwell and Jerry Hadley. Also on hand for the gala evening are pianists John Browning and Craig Rutenberg, Jay Ungar, Molly Mason, and David Alpher. The special was recorded in concert at New York’s Town Hall and on location in Kentucky; Amherst, Walden Pond, and Concord, MA; and at Walt Whitman’s Camden, NJ home.

“Our songs have become as varied as our people,” maintains Hampson, who conceived the special and served as artistic director and creative consultant. “Because I’m an American singer I’ve always cared deeply about our songs.”

Choosing the telecast title from the famed Walt Whitman poem, Hampson stresses that what Whitman heard America singing in 1860 was a plethora of songs and styles: the hymns of the East, the cowboy songs of the West, the work songs of the North, the spirituals of the South. “All were part of the American experience, and provided the ground from which the American concert song sprang,” Hampson says.

We recommend that you first enter I HEAR AMERICA SINGING in either of two ways: through the Overview, which provides a narrative history of American concert song, or the Timeline, which presents that history in listed format. Also included is a Resources section, containing an extensive bibliography; and the Credits.

February 21st, 2005   |  Permalink  |  Filed under: New York 1996

I Hear America Singing
The Hampson Project I

Aaron Copland, Kurt Weill, Karl Amadeus Hartmann, Charles Ives
Radio Symphonieorchester Wien, Dennis Russell Davies
Felsenreitschule – July 30, 2001

Aaron COPLAND (1900-1990)
Fanfare for the Common Man

Kurt WEILL (1900-1950)
Four Songs of Walt Whitman

Beat! Beat! Drums!
O Captain! My Captain!
Come Up from the Fields Father
Dirge for Two Veterans

Karl Amadeus HARTMANN (1905-1963)
Sinfonia tragica

Introduction – In Emotional Voice – Adagio
Tumultuoso. Allegro

INTERMISSION | PAUSE

Charles IVES (1874-1954)
Three Places in New England

The “St. Gaudens” in Boston Common – very slowly
Putnam’s Camp, Redding, Connecticut – Allegro, Andante animato, Allegro moderato, Animando
The Housatonic at Stockbridge – Adagio molto, Allegro moderato, Allegro con brio

Aaron COPLAND (1900-1990)
From “Old American Songs” first & second set

Simple Gifts
Long Time Ago
The Little Horses
The Golden Willow Tree
The Boatmen’s Dance

END OF PROGRAM | ENDE DES PROGRAMMS

February 20th, 2005   |  Permalink  |  Filed under: Salzburg 2001

Thomas Hampson